Pioneer SP-BS22-LR Vs Micca MB42X

One of the toughest things to do when buying speakers is picking between two good choices. You have to weigh your options between the various strengths of speakers which reviewers always hold in high esteem. It is therefore key to understand the differences between them so that you make an informed decision.

Both the Pioneer BS22 speakers and the Micca MB42X are commonly chosen as the first speakers for a new audio enthusiast. They are both speakers which are well regarded and get lots of praise from enthusiasts.

There are good reasons to choose one versus the other. The Pioneer BS22 is clearly a cut above the Micca in performance, but the Micca MB42X costs 30% less and has a much more compact size.

wpid-img_20151109_223321529.jpg
Pioneer Bs22 and Micca MB42X

Continue reading

Pioneer BS22 vs Dayton B652-Air

When looking at speakers, a common thing to wonder is what are you getting for your extra money. While bother the Pioneer BS22 and Dayton B652-Air are considered “good for the money” and “budget” speakers, the Pioneer speaker costs twice as much.

I will use this post to help explain what exactly you’re getting for twice the money.

wpid-img_20151109_223300006.jpg
Pioneer BS22-LR Alongside Dayton B652-AIR

 

Continue reading

Dayton Audio B652 vs. Dayton Audio B652-AIR

Dayton Audio makes two versions of its well-received B652 speaker. The first costs $40, and the second has an upgraded tweeter and costs $60. I’ve reviewed the Dayton B652 here, as well as the Dayton B652-AIR.

Dayton B652 (right) and Dayton B652-Air (left)
Dayton B652 (left) and Dayton B652-Air (right)

Continue reading

Why I’m Not Like Other Tech and Audio Writers

If you’ve read as much work from tech journalists as I have, you have probably noticed it kind of stinks. Most of what sites like Gizmodo, Engadget, the Verge, Ars Technia, CNET, et cetera put out are either just rehashes of company press releases, amateur analysis, second rate political opinion pieces, or some combination of the three.

That’s not happening here. Most tech writers are not technical experts. They are people who have degrees in finding, aggregating and condensing information from a variety of sources. They aren’t in any position to be an authoritative source on anything. They don’t, at a fundamental level, understand the things that they are reporting on.

Some outlets are obviously better than others. There are people who are experts on listening and know how to use laboratory instruments to understand a piece of electronics. Those people will give you measurements alongside their reviews and are people you should look to for advice and reviews. In addition to legacy publications like Sound and Vision, and Stereophile (two brands owned by one group), you should check out:

  • Average Joe Audiophile is run by a dedicated amateur who has been doing in depth frequency response measurements for a couple of years.
  • No Audiophile is run by another dedicated amateur who loves to open up speakers and review them for computer use.

However, as far as I can tell, there aren’t any people blogging about tech who actually have jobs in the field. I have worked on audio and acoustics problems in the air, on the ground, in your house, in your car and underwater. I’ve worked on them for every sort of customer. I am a dedicated enthusiast. I worked on acoustics and sound problems in academia. When it comes to working with sound, I’ve been there. My 9-5 job is working with sound. When I got my Master’s from Georgia Tech, I took classes in audio and acoustics, and worked on sound related problems for my research.

That’s what you get by reading someone like me. I know and understand audio products almost as well as the people making them. I could be doing those kinds of jobs if I wanted to change what I’m currently doing. And because you’re reading someone who knows their audio so well, you won’t be reliant on a non-technical person repeating information someone else tells them. I can give you straight, unfiltered opinions from an expert.

Keep watching this space, Affordable Home Audio is going to be an interesting place.

Home Theater Report: Mad Max Fury Road

This weekend I watched Mad Max: Fury Road this weekend and it was quite an experience on the big screen.The movie itself is one that demands to be seen on a large screen with good speakers.

The movie starts off with a spectacular, gruesome and fear-inspiring look at an outpost of civilization ruled by a tyrannical warlord. The visuals of the Citadel and its features looked great on the big screen, and painted the scene of the reemergence of civilization.

Press Image for Mad Max Fury Road
Press Image for Mad Max Fury Road

Continue reading

Holiday 2015 Guide for Bluetooth Speakers and Soundbars

Well, its that time of year. You’re thinking about what to get your husband, boyfriend, father or brother for Christmas. You’ve thought about some speakers for the TV or maybe a Bluetooth speaker is something they’d really enjoy. If you’re not well versed in the audio world, you’re going to get caught up by marketing and buy something that under performs while being overpriced.

I’m here to help you avoid falling for marketing pitfalls and get you the perfect gift. You only have to follow three easy rules.

My 3 Rules of Beating Audio Marketers
1. Don’t spend more than $20 on stuff made of plastic
2. If they aren’t known for making audio equipment (Vizio, Samsung, etc), don’t buy from them
3. The smaller the speaker, the worse it sounds

If you follow those three rules, you won’t fall for the marketing tricks. Rule 3 is less important than the other two, though. Big plastic speakers will sound worse than small quality speakers. But large quality speakers beat small quality speakers 9 times out of 10.

Continue reading